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LANDOVER, MD - NOVEMBER 20: Quarterback Aaron Rodgers #12 of the Green Bay Packers passes the ball against the Washington Redskins in the third quarter at FedExField on November 20, 2016 in Landover, Maryland. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

Aaron Rodgers Calls Out Young Packers Wide Receivers For Low Effort At Practices

Aaron Rodgers is not happy with the Green Bay Packers’ core of young receivers.

Aaron Rodgers Criticizes Young Packers for Bad Play

The veteran quarterback on Tuesday criticized the team’s youngsters for not putting in enough work during practices. According to ESPN, Rodgers ended Tuesday’s session by throwing to the scout team, although by the time practice finished the QB was so angry he tossed the ball toward some “tackling dummies on the sideline.”

“It was one of the worst cards sessions we’ve had,” Rodgers said. “I don’t know how you can make it any simpler. You literally have what the play would be in our terminology on the card, and the effort level was very low, especially with what I’m accustomed to. I’ve been running that period for a number of years. So it’s not a good start for us on the card period for the young guys. I think [DeAngelo] Yancey has really progressed, G-Mo [Geronimo Allison]. Obviously, 16 [Jake Kumerow]. But everybody else was kind of piss poor.”

Rodgers, one of the top quarterbacks in the NFL, continued bemoaning the receivers’ poor performances and insisted there is no excuse for running plays as directed by coaches.

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“I was just answering the question. I think it’s pretty evident to anybody watching the end of practice, there were some mental errors,” said Rodgers. “That’s the frustrating thing. It’s one thing if you’re picturing a play in your mind and you’re thinking about it and you’re a little off, but when you’re looking at a card that tells you exactly where to line up and exactly where the play is, there aren’t any excuses for that.”

All these comments strongly suggest Rodgers may not play in the Packers’ pre-season opener against the Tennessee Titans on Thursday. The quarterback can’t be blamed for wanting his receivers to meet him halfway. After all, Rodgers’ 2017 season was cut short by a collarbone injury, so he will surely be viciously vying for another playoff appearance this year. Plus, Green Bay’s defense has struggled in recent years, so a strong offense — and especially a powerful receiving corps — is even more crucial.

This year, Green Bay drafted three wideouts, though none in the first three rounds: J’Mon Moore (fourth round), Marquez Valdes-Scantling (fifth round) and Equanimeous St. Brown (sixth). The Packers released Jordy Nelson — one of Rodgers’ top receiving targets — this offseason, so Rodgers will have to rely on a fresher group of receivers this fall.

In addition to praising veteran receivers like Davante Adams and Randall Cobb, Rodgers has lauded Kumerow several times thus far. The 26-year-old wideout is entering his fourth NFL season and second with the Packers.

In an interview with The Ringer’s Kevin Clark this week, Rodgers also revealed what he would change about the NFL if he was commissioner. First, the quarterback said, he would fight for players’ rights to play larger roles in the decisions made by team owners. Rodgers said he would even try to reduce the function lawyers serve in some decisions.

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Then, Rodgers added, he would eliminate the existence of franchise tags. “I think that gives the team a lot of power over your future,” he said of tags.

Finally, Rodgers stated that if he was in charge of the NFL he would permit teams to go over the salary cap if necessary because luxury taxes could help offset any major financial issues.

Rodgers’ first two proposals seem very reasonable, or at least the reasoning behind them are. Would Roger Goodell ever approve these types of changes? Probably not, but it’s interesting to learn what NFL veterans think of the current state of the league.

 

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Written by Pablo Mena